Pay it Forward Soviet-style

Remember Misha, the Soviet Olympic mascot?

Here’s another example that in the Soviet Union the good things were good: The animated short film “Thank you!” by Vladimir Tarasov.

It’s very Soviet, but in a good way. Three children fly in a plane, enjoy the flight and thank the pilot. The pilot is flattered, but he suggests them to thank the engineer who designed the plane, so they do. The engineer is hinted to be Jewish, and he’s smoking a cigarette while designing the plane—in the 1970s nobody complained that depicting smoking is dangerous to children. The engineer suggests the children to thank the factory workers who built the plane. The factory worker turns out to be Georgian and is depicted as an orchestra conductor; he suggests the children to thank the forgery worker who made the metal for the plane.

The forgery worker, who turns out to be Ukrainian, and even says a couple of Ukrainian words, suggests the children to thank the miner who brought the ore to the forgery. The miner suggests to thank the geologist, who found the ore. And the geologist suggest to thank the pilot, who brought him from to Taiga, where he found the ore.

As with many Soviet animated films, this one is both simple and arty.

2 Responses to “Pay it Forward Soviet-style”


  1. 1 nevioth 2012-12-13 at 08:48

    That was very beautiful… But according to what is hinted the engineer being Jewish?

  2. 2 aharoni 2012-12-14 at 21:58

    His patronymic is Lvovich, which is frequently, though not necessarily, Jewish. And engineering is a bit of a Jewish profession. There’s also something Jewish in the hair, though it’s hard to describe.


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